The Tempest

The stage is set for a tumultuous new production of The Tempest, Shakespeare’s tale of reckoning and redemption, this summer in the Globe Theatre. 

For powerful Prospero’s opening act of revenge, he raises a ferocious storm to shipwreck a crew of men - including his usurping brother - onto the remote island he now rules.
 
His unwitting cast is now in position and, with reluctant support from the island’s colonised inhabitants, Prospero’s designs of magical and emotional manipulation unfurl with life-changing force. 

Get ready to be shaken by Shakespeare’s most elemental comedy, brought to life by our 2022 Globe Ensemble with direction from Associate Artistic Director Sean Holmes (A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Twelfth Night, Globe).
 
‘O brave new world,
That has such people in't!’
(Act IV, scene 1)

Times

Friday 22 July 2022 - Saturday 22 October 2022

Booking Information

All performances will be played at full capacity. The yard will be standing tickets. They ask audience to wear mask and ask for proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative lateral flow test.

Good To Know

All performances will be played at full capacity. The yard will be standing tickets. They ask audience to wear mask and ask for proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative lateral flow test.

Additional Details & FAQ

Access Information

For more information regarding accessibility, please click here.

Cancellation Policy

1. If you test positive for COVID-19, display symptoms, or are asked to isolate by NHS Test and Trace you can exchange your tickets.
2. If the show is cancelled due to COVID-19 or any other reason, you will be offered a free exchange or refund.
3. If the show is going ahead and you are able to attend, there will be no exchange or refund available.

Where Do I Go

Shakespeare’s Globe
21 New Globe Walk
Bankside
London
SE1 9DT

Reviews

3.9(50 reviews)
  • Sam A

    Oct 23, 2022

    Saw this with my daughter as our first Shakespeare experience and we were not disappointed! Incredible acting, great modern day twists, and a hugely engaging, fully immersive experience. We felt drawn into the performance as if we were part of it! Superb night for us!

  • Ronnie Ireland

    Oct 17, 2022

    I couldn't really empathise with this production. It seemed to miss out Magic and its Power and anything serious. It also seemed desperate to be funny all the time in a mix of slapstick and sitcom styles which, for me, became tedious. The visual style is the now typical rag bag of contemporary / kitsch props and effects with the music hugely under contributing and the "masque" was frankly embarrassing. I was looking forward so much to this production and the more I reflected on it, the more I was disappointed by it. Prospero was powerful when occasionally allowed to be and the theatre hushed. The morality of power through magic and enslavement - not really there. Caliban was a a lightweight comic turn and certainly no "monster" in any sense of the word - which is difficult when he is constantly referred to as one - and is patently not. This missed a chance to examine what a "monster" might mean now. When he has to threaten Prospero it does not ring true as it comes from nowhere - petty resentment rather than a deep desire for revenge I think the actors are much better than the production and indeed deserve better. It seemed another muddled production with no clear idea of where it is going - Julius Caesar was the same, although I did listen to the interview with director and thought her ideas did not come across in the production. King Lear on the other hand, really hit home. Maybe it's just me, but the Globe is a wonderful, special place and I would love to come to see more work there. These last two productions make me question it however.

  • Pip

    Oct 7, 2022

    Disappointingly dumbed down to the lowest common denominator and inexpertly played for cheap laughs, the directorial concept left much to be desired in failing to propel the thematic intentions of the play. With too many actors gabbling their lines, the real power and magic of the language of The Tempest was lost. In terms of characterisation, no player was more tedious than the actor in the role of Ariel, a character scripted by Shakespeare to be made of air, but sadly in this production heavily earth-bound and clunky. An insult to any intelligent audience member, the performance I viewed was certainly not theatre at its best.